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over same-sex marriage and civil rights law. >> woodruff: then we turn to the presidential campaign and the analysis of stuart rothenberg and susan page as the candidates fine tune their messages days before the first debate. >> brown: we zero in on one issue confronting the candidates. hari sreenivasan reports on the safety net program known as medicaid. >> anyone of us at an advanced age really is just one fall away from a broken hip that could end you up in a nursing home. >> woodruff: ray suarez talks with author hedrick smith. his new book explores the dismantling of the american dream for the middle class. >> brown: and we look at oppression and empowerment for women around the world, with journalists and filmmakers nicholas kristof and sheryl wudunn. >> once you give a woman education and a chance to work, she can astound you. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and...
, the civil war and the civil rights era, which brings this nuanced exploration into the 20th century. as we approach the sesquicentennial of the proclamation, wait brings to light how american writers brought their own perspectives to bear on the centennial of the war. how they grapple with the issues it raised unhealthy influence public number and commemoration of the word to varying degrees. the four writers from the southern novelist and essayist, robert penn warren to recant his view of the civil war is a lost cause midwestern historian bruce cotton causes her to norman rockwell come in part because his capacious works on the civil war were widely read at the middle of the century. northern utes in literary critic, edmund wilson looked at the war in terms of its own pacifism, often neglect in the role of race in it in the northern negro novelist james baldwin who is the most acute essayist and tinker in the american psyche hands down working at that time. blight said that all four, and i quote, are geared to say with america's tendency towards a progressive tribal sunny sense of history
they are at a disadvantage, i completely agree with kleiza rice that the civil rights issue of our day is school choice and the disaster of the public schools, it is a universal law of nature that everything run by the government will become worse and more expensive over time. everything that is sold on the private market will become better and less expensive over time. like flat screen tv's, cell phones. versus the post office, public schools, and amtrak food service. and by the way, our entire health care is now going to be put in the hands -- in the capable hands of the federal government. >> one more school thing. also from "the new york times." >> i disagree. >> you may not. four decades after clashes, bottom of the again debates school busing. nearly four decades after the city was convulsed by violence over court-ordered segregation, boston is working to reduce its reliance on busing at a school system now made up of largely minority students. although court-ordered busing ended more than two decades ago, only 13% of students in boston, 13% in the public schools, today are white. and the school
. when the civil rights movement happened, they shifted. i remember discussions in the 1980's and 1990's. the latino community, to be appealed to on issues like small government and family values, and they wrote off that possibility, quite frankly, with racism, seeing every brown person, every latino, as an illegal. they have done the same thing with the asian community. they used to be very republican. coming from hostile countries -- they have been driven into the democratic party with subtle and not so subtle racial appeals. i think they believe if they can do what they did in 2010, they can turn out their older white bass, and they can hold onto power, and they can -- they can turn out their older what it -- white base -- it is not a permanent strategy, but it can keep them in power for a while. and it is ugly. tavis: the new book from joan walsh is "what's the matter with white people?: why we long for a golden age that never was." she tells a wonderful story about her family and their presence. i have only scratched the surface, so you may want to pick it up. joan, thank you. >> th
...his grandfather...was civil rights activiit...clarence mitchell, ago...this former state &psenator...declared...he was done...with the democcats. "because they're hypocrits." "the democratic partyy" (mitchell) "proclaims to be pfrican-ameeicans. if that's - country runs by democrats. baltimore city is the one of the poooest cities in the countty, majority african- american, run by ddmocrats. what's wrong with that picture?"(then why not because the reppblican party is not much better either. that's why i'm ot a pepubllcan."((naas))rob sobhani...wass.. a republican...yearrsago..ut he...too... has defected.he's pow running for u.s. senate....aa an "independent". (sobhani) "it's shameful hat theii party abovv their s puu two parties, aalot of ideas, e so they blame eaah other." you'veeprobably seen sobhani's... tv ads...he's already spent more than fouu milliin dollars ...of his own money.and he's tryinggto catpure the attentiin...not only of disgruntled...demo craassand republicans. in maryland...there are alsoo..more than584-thousand reeistered... as "un-affiliated". (sobh
on civil rights grounds because he was not on abortion. it has nothing to do with black people anymore. who was i talking about? host: charles pickering. guest: he was a prosecutor prosecuting the klan. he was putting his life at jeopardy and sent his kids to public schools. not white liberals. host: this is missy in buffalo. good morning. caller: i think you're brilliant. you are my role model. i just wanted to say that and i can wait to read your book. i know your book covers the 1970's and 1980's. the one topic they bring up with republicans is slavery. the republicans had a huge role in ending slavery, they still use that as a talking point against our party. guest: and the apocryphal southern strategy. that is the most amazing rewrite in history. in my third book, a large part of that was telling the truth of joe mccarthy. that covered about five years. liberals have reread the history to cover 200 years. republicans or the party to talk about slavery. it was for the next 100 years with platforms endorsing justice marshall -- attorney 30 marshall's -- ternate thurgood marshall -- attor
of republicans pushing civil rights legislation, antipole tax legislation, anti-link legislation. public accommodations legislation with the democrats constantly blocking, blocking, blocking and the tricks they use these were liberal democrats. they weren't conservative democrats. you just become so frustrated that i think nixon was absolutely right. you can hear the frustration in the speeches he gave about it he said the building trades have been given long enough to -- to -- to voluntarily integrate their work forces. if they're going -- i've had it now. if they refuse to hire black people, we're going to get results now. so i supported it back then i think he was right. >> let me just add one other person's thought on affirmative action and get your response and then we'll start taking calls. this is a piece in the "new york times" this morning by a gentleman by the name of thomas eppenshade. no longer separate equal race in college, an elite college admission and college life he's the professor in [ indiscernible ] he believes affirmative action is beneficial but doesn't believe the
with that -- "american oracle' the civil war in the civil rights era which brings this new ones exploration into the 20th century. as we approach this as quick -- sesquicentennial blight brings to light for american writers with their own perspectives to bear on the centennial of the civil war, how they grappled with the issues it raised and how they influenced public memory and commemoration of the board to varying degrees. for writers like features, southern novelists and essayists robert can want he would come to recant his view of the civil war as a lost cause, midwestern historian bruce catton whom andrew and company calls it sort of literary norman rockwell in part because his capacious works on the civil war were widely read at the middle of the century, northern elite and literary critic edwin wilson who looked at the war in terms of his own pacifism often neglecting the world of race and it and the northern novelist and essayist james baldwin who was the most acute essayist and thinker of race on the american psyche hands down working at that time. blight said in an interview with the chronicle
the civil rights movement, the gay and less lesbian movement. actually, i would like to say especially to my republican women friends these folks are not republicans. a lot of them used to be democrats. and started to lead the republican party when the civil rights act of 1963 passed and so on. so my -- really what's happened is that one party has campaigned against women you know. women have responded to that. >> jennifer: so you're stumping for the president. is president obama a feminist? >> yes i think he's a feminist. we had worked with him in illinois when he was in the state legislature. and he supported all of the issues of equality and he supported reproductive freedom. and the point is any way that feminist is a word that we chose because it could apply to men as well as women. and it -- it just means a person who is in favor of full social economic political equality of women and men and it is a great boon to men too. it actually has lengthened their lives, you know, to stop the extreme polarization of the gende
who became a civil rights champion and founded the united farm workers union. >> every time somebody's son or daughter comes and learns about the history of this movement, i want them to know that our journey is never hopeless. our work is never done. i want them to remember that true courage is revealed when the night is darkest and the resistance is strongest and we somehow find it in ourselves to stand up for what we believe in. >> after paying his respects to the widow of chavez, the president flew off to san francisco for a round of campaign events. >>> mitt romney is campaigning in virginia again today, in a major foreign policy address at the virginia military institute, he continued to blast president obama's leadership in the middle east, and offered his own view. >> when we look at the middle east today, with iran closer than ever to nuclear weapons capability, with the conflict in syria threatening to destabilize the region and violent extremists on the march, and with an american ambassador and three others dead likely at the hands of the al qaeda affiliates, it's clear t
, as the number of briefs that outline for a higher education, business officials, civil rights groups, that outlined support for the use of race at the university of texas, briefs that are in opposition. but broader public opinion, it appears only about a quarter of the u.s. population supports the idea of racial preferences in college admissions. by contrast, in the second set of figures, the blues set of figures, there is broad support among the same set of voters for preference in college admissions based on income. given these results, it is not surprising that ward connerly, who will be on the panel, has been extremely successful in his efforts to ban affirmative action based on race in a number of states. so far, the efforts are 546. -- five for six. five out of six times, voters, when given the option, have said we should and the option of racial affirmative action at colleges and public employment, including blue states like california, michigan, and washington. the second major problem facing affirmative-action, of course, is the legal issue, which will be joined in the fishe
. >> you know, one thing that really struck me was his involvement in the civil rights. i look at the country today, there are so many people that don't know the history, have no clue about the history of civil rights. here is your father speaking very passionately about a young black student who had been admitted to the university of mississippi. they were protesting on the grounds. they did not want james meredith there. your father was talking to the governor about that. >> we got to get order up there. that's what we thought was going to happen. >> mr. president, please, why don't you stop -- >> how can i remove him governor when there's a riot in the street and he might step out of the building and something -- let's get order up there and then we can do something. >> we've got to get somebody out there to get order and stop the firing and the shooting. then you and i will talk on the phone about meredith. first we've got to get order. >> he's really mad. i know the tone from my aunts and uncles. civil rights went from being important but not a heated issue during his pres
come from? >> guest: well, my first political involvement was in the civil rights movement, where i came along at a time when if you were young and idealistic and in the south, that was--you pretty much were drawn to that. c-span: but what got you interested in that? what--what kind of a--what was the home like? >> guest: my family is quite conservative. my father is, i would say, extremely conservative. i--it was--it--it--it... c-span: is he alive? >> guest: yes, he is. my mama, bless her heart, passed on. i sometimes think it may have been my mother's fault. my mother tried--she--she was certainly, i assure you without success, to drill good manners into my head. and in some ways i think that manners are just a formal expression of how you treat people. and in--the way black people were treated before the civil rights movement, it was clear to me, was very wrong. it was an easy call. c-span: were they political conservatives, ideological conservatives, your parents? >> guest: yeah. both republicans, lifelong. c-span: you write a column about your mom. it's the last thing in the bo
like you also thought the civil rights movement for african-americans took the opportunity of the franchise to run for office. if you don't like those laws, you become a lawmaker. >> become part of the solution. i think that's -- i want to just say about president obama, he's one of the reasons that people are so mobilized by himment you can identify with him on multiple levels. i like to think of president obama as an immigrant. certainly a child of an immigrant. there are multiple levels at which you can identify with that and it gave people his election also mobilized a lot of different folks to feel that something was possible. >> certainly a cosmopolitan citizen having lived in schools, indonesia, a half sister who was indonesian. as well as american like. that idea of a cosmopolitan person is part what the immigrant story is. grace, i wish you great luck in your campaign. thank you, sayu, robert and chloe are back for me. next we're talking about affirmative action. jack, you're a little boring. boring. boring. [ jack ] after lauren broke up with me, i went to the cit
it be civil rights, whether it be, you know workplace safety, you know, how long you work every week, these kind of things are all things that were implemented from the top down and nobody here's going to say that the 40-hour work week was a bad idea. nobody's going to say that. that... that you know people of color can now vote. nobody's going to say that. it just, out of were they very, very popular things when they came out? no, they were not. voting right, voting rights act, civil rights act were very... very vilified in many parts of the country. but the idea that you know obamacare is not the answer, it probably isn't, but something has to be done about this problem and if you don't do anything, which is going to keep ballooning this thing. >> obamacare scares me, you know. i don't want the government knowing my personal issues or my healthcare. i don't want them to tell me that i can't go to a-- my own doctor. and right now my family physician has a sign in the window that says, no obamacare. i'm scared. >> reporter: go ahead, chastity. >> but i think at the end of the day gov
and the u.s. steel and so forth. the civil rights movement put pressure on washington to open up the american dream to blacks and other minorities. part of what happened to them was it was so successful. but part of what happened to them was there was a power shift. there was a tremendous change of power in washington, and that had big effect on the ability of middle class americans to achieve the american dream. the other thing that happened is what i call wedge economics. the splitting of the american middle class off from the games of the national economy. so that today you can see the economy improving bit by bit by middle class people aren't doing that much better. people at the top are doing real well. corporations are reporting profits, but the people in the middle aren't doing that well. back in the old days tbhak the heyday of the middle class, everybody sharedded in that prosperity. today everybody doesn't share in that prosperity. that's why so many people feel so much pain. >> suarez: you take us again and again in the book to key moments where things could have gone
. in a "there was a country," ch right about civil war. and larry bowman in at the sumwalt writes about how wrong -- admiral zumwalt. look for these titles in bookstores this coming week and watch for the authors in the near future on both tv and at booktv.org. >> this month as the president of candidates debate, we are asking middle and high school students to send a message to the president as part of the studentcam video competition. in a short video, students will answer the question what the most important issue is in the campaign for 2013. it is open for students' grades 6-12. for complete details and rules, go online to studentcam.org. >> washington journal continues. host: in the segment we will talk about variety. our guest, melanie eversley joins us from new york. welcome. guest: thank you. host: we invited to specifically to talk about what has been happening in pennsylvania. what happened in that state concerning voter i.d.? guest: essentially, pennsylvania was a number of of states -- was one of a number of states across the country attempting to pass legislation that would req
important novel for african-americans to articulate civil rights. it exhibited an enormous influence not just and other writers but on leaving political figures and social activists. so without "uncle tom's cabin" you rich without strong, written very much to model. he wanted to model his work during the reconstruction era after "uncle tom's cabin." james baldwin famously in 1955 publishers the screen against "uncle tom's cabin." but for him, too, in the 1950s he says no novel has ever exerted over him like the power of "uncle tom's cabin." it's the sentimental power of this novel that last very much to the present day. >> watch booktv all weekend to see more of our recent visit to augusta, maine. for more information on this and other cities visited by booktv's local content vehicles go to c-span.org/localcontent. >> antonio mendez presents his book, "argo," at the international spy museum in d.c. arco details the story of six americans who escaped from the u.s. embassy during the iran hostage crisis in 1979. the cia operation to find and get them out of the country involved cia off
. >>> president obama's in california attending fund-raisers and honoring the late labor and civil rights actist cesar chavez. our white house correspondent dan lothian is traveling with the president right now. what's the latest areaction coming from the obama campaign? >> reporter: first of all, the president himself has not reacted to that speech by mitt romney. but last night at a major fund-raiser in los angeles, he was flexing his foreign policy muscles right off the top of his remarks, he was talking about how he ended the war in iraq, how he's winding down the war in afghanistan, how he's gone after terrorists, how he got osama bin laden. those are just some examples, says his campaign, of strong leadership. as president obama honored civil rights icon cesar chavez -- >> the movement he helped to lead was sustained by a generation of organizers who stood up and spoke out and urged others to do the same. >> reporter: his campaign worked to shred gop nominee mitt romney's foreign policy chops, rolling out this hard-hitting web ad reminding voters of what they called stumbles on the world s
when the rising tide with the fight for civil rights swept across the nation. thousands of people might age were heading down to mississippi to break the back of segregation in. i was living in cambridge at the time. this was the 1960's. a volkswagen bug. i drove across town into the black community. i was never there before. although i had grown up just outside of boston. a revered figure of the black community both the associative doctor came and i asked him may i be of use? he said yes, young man. you can. i am glad you came here to talk with me in your own home town. you don't need to go to mississippi to find injustice. you can find the struggle here. come into our schools to help our children. i walked into the headquarters and said i will be a teacher. and had never heard of certification. [laughter] i knew nothing about teaching. they did not teach you anything useful at harvard. they still don't. [laughter] the first day i taught they sent me to teach kindergarten. the first time i ever taught in my life. i was terrified. i had no idea what you do with people that size. they we
at the tacoma, glenmont, u street and georgia avenue stations. several civil rights organizations are planning counter-ads. >>> a former cincinnati bengals cheerleader who admitted to having sex with a 17-year-old will not go to jail. sarah jones taught at the school where that teen attends and she has since agreed never to apply for another teaching job again. jones walked out of the courtroom actually hand in hand with that teenager. she's now working as a legal secretary. >>> the washington nationals are preparing for their first home playoff game after taking one on the chin in st. louis. jordan zimmerman got the start yesterday despite being 0-5 against the cards in the regular season. his bad luck against st. louis continued in the post season. zimmerman only lasted three innings giving up seven hits and five runs. the nats shuffled out seven different pitchers. as a group they gave up 12 runs. the cardinals crushed the nats 12-4. the series is at one game a piece. >> they got a split away from home and come home. do it in front of the home crowd instead. >>> encouraging news for the red
. contrast that with a judge that was blocked by the democrats on civil rights grounds because he was not on abortion. it has nothing to do with black people anymore. who was i talking about? host: charles pickering. guest: he was a prosecutor prosecuting the klan. he was putting his life at jeopardy and sent his kids to public schools. not white liberals. host: this is missy in buffalo. good morning. caller: i think you're brilliant. you are my role model. i just wanted to say that and i can wait to read your book. i know your book covers the 1970's and 1980's. the one topic they bring up with republicans is slavery. the republicans had a huge role in ending slavery, they still use that as a talking point against our party. guest: and the apocryphal southern strategy. that is the most amazing rewrite in history. in my third book, a large part of that was telling the truth of joe mccarthy. that covered about five years. liberals have reread the history to cover 200 years. republicans or the party to talk about slavery. it was for the next 100 years with platforms endorsing justice
offenders and they are cunning and devious and to say their civil rights are violated, the first and 14th amendments, because they can't have a sign, you know, and halloween deck kra decorations to come into hair house, they've forfeited their right to have access to children. >> heather: and the attorney likening it to branding. and mentioning what they need to document let's look at the things required in the ordinance, or this law that was actually passed by the city of simi valley. first of all, a sign they have to post on their door, just says this, doesn't say i'm a sex offender, it says no candy or treats at this residence. they have to leave all exterior decorative and ornamental lighting off, 5:00 p.m. to midnight and, refrain from decorating their front yard and house exterior and don't answer the door to children trick-or-treating. >> essentially they are saying, you cannot try to lure these children. we know this is what you do. and we know you want children and know to -- sex with it i should say and you will not change your behavior and here, at the end of the day, when the
of 5 saying the regulations violent their civil rights. >> basically what does halloween have to do with the crime committed and yeah pedophiles are ickey and i don't want my kid going and trick or treating at their house but that is what i report. >> so far this is the first law to be challenged in court. >> 7:52. a wild animal running loose down a busy street in florida. this is where it happened. how a t-shirt helped end this wild situation. >> plus sal will have a check on the roads, including once again slow traffic conditions on 280 in san jose. we are the sons and daughters of farmers who made cheese; the keepers of the loafs. the people who will never lower the bar. our world started in deep green grass and rain and the hills and the waves and the big, tall trees of tillamook, oregon. we make cheese of an exquisite standard and we live in a special place... where pure and good were invented. >>> 7:55, an emu back with its owner after running loose. the bird jumped its its enclosure and did that to get it undercontrol. >> sal, no tacos on 280 is it? >> no, nothing like that
other political ends as i describe, it was always republicans pushing civil rights legislation, being blocked by democrats for five minutes in 1964 democrats pretended to care about black people, and then they just started slapping the civil rights label on causes having nothing to do with black people and, in fact, often opposed to black people. megyn: in today's day and age, i think the assumption is that democratic policies are better for blacks -- [laughter] because they believe in affirmative action, and today believe in sort of a hand up, and a lot of blacks are struggling in lower socioeconomic neighborhoods. and they believe democrats are empathetic to that situation. that's the line. >> that is certainly the line, and it is absolutely untrue. i mean, four years of obama there was an article going around yesterday on the drudge report that four years of obama has virtually wiped out the black middle class. that's just the economic point. never be fooled into thinking that what democrats care about is the poor, the elderly, minorities. what they care about are government sector
partly of my life who was a civil rights leader, clarence jones. he was martin luther king jr.'s lawyer. obama reminds me of growing up a little bit with this man because he was in the business world. he was in the political world and he had to keep a certain demeanor. he was successful, so he moved up to a fancy neighborhood in the bronx, believe it or not there was one back then in riverdale, and he would go jogging every morning. every single morning he was stopped by the police. this was 1960--1970. he always managed to keep an integrity about him. and a dignity about him. i think he had to do that out of political necessity. out of survival. that article in the atlantic talked about whether obama has the freedom to react like he would really emotionally want to react. i don't know. what do you think about that? we all want him to just deck him. we all want him to roll up his sleeves and deal with the lies head on and say i'm sorry, are you talking to me? you know what i mean? and just walk over and go, look me in the eye and say that again, pal, because i got some things i'm going
to police. >>> civil rights attorneys asking a judge to put oakland police department under federal receivership stemming from the infamous riders case which went to trial in 2002, four officers were accused of vigilante justice the settlement called for reforms. more than a decade later those reforms are still not complete. oakland city officials say they are working to meet full compliance. no police department in the nation has ever been under federal receivership. >>> oakland police launched new service to get more anonymous crime tips. you can text the oakland police department with information. the service is provided by a website that encrypts the sender's information so police can get in touch but everything stay as anonymous. more information on abc7news.com click on see it on tv. >>> any rain would be a well some sight in santa clara county where officials are stopping boating activities on two reservoirs. the low levels are results of minimal rainfall and water storage prestrict s last winter was the driest year. >>> city of cupertino flying at half-staff today to mark th
's against your civil rights. i don't want to get the flu shot. and to me it seems like i'm being forced into putting a virus in my body that i object to. >> we need to have a workforce available when the public needs fit they are sick and people choose to work in a hospital. >> if workers have a medical condition that prevents them from getting the shot they have to wear a mask. >>> the unemployment rate fell in september. more people returned to the labor force and hiring was steady. in this week's smart is the new rich meet one guy who took a big risk to make a career change in a brightening job market. here's christine romans. >> reporter: he wanted to switch careers from operations in i.t. to marketing and big data. in a slow jobs market that takes training and risk. >> i decided to go back to business school and i went part time and realized that i needed even more training so i left my full time position and gained internship at cbs. and that was a great gateway. so the internship plus the mba, i was able to fortunately land at met life. looking at the data more on the marketing
in the summer that year when the rising tide in the fight for civil rights swept across the nation. thousands of young people my age or heading to mississippi to try to break the back of segregation in the south. i was living in cambridge at the time. one day i simply got in my car. this was the 1916s. it was a little par. and i drove across town into the black community. i had never been in the black community before although i had grown up just outside of boston and i went to a minister, a wonderful man, some of you may recall his name. a revered figure in the black community and some close associate of dr. king and i asked him simply may i be of use? and he said yes, young man, you can. and he said i am glad you are here to talk to me in your own home town because you don't need to go to mississippi to find injustice in america. he said you can join the struggle here. come into schools and try to help our children. i walked into the headquarters of boston public school and said i am going to be a teacher. i had never heard of certification. i knew nothing about teaching. didn't teach anyth
, delivering his historic address in 1964. it was a speech that changed the national debate on civil rights. well, here we are with an election 30 days away. and the debates are in spule swing. a new book, presidential courage, three speeches that changed america, takes a look at the moments that have truly inspire period our nation. warren kozak is the author and he is here live. >> thanks for having me on. >> jamie: this is inspiring. you certainly did your homework. i read the speeches, one is four paragraphs. >> linkon's second inaugural, four paragraphs. can you believe that? >> jamie: what does it take to inspire a nation? how important are the words that the presidents and presidential candidates say? >> critical, but what we are looking at are 3 speech, three presidents, three incredibly important junctures in our history. really the most dangerous momes in our history. and these three presidents through their words were able to give the country courage to make the changes that needed to be made. you don't hear that anywhere. >> jamie: you cover fdr, jfk and lincoln. how did you pic
of violating their civil rights by coercing their confessions. the city has defended 9 way it's conducted its investigation. the filmmaker refuse to share outtakes citing shield laws. >> we believe we are protected under the shield laws as journalists and we don't think it's fair for the government to intrude in our research. >> reporter: a lawyer for the city says the film isn't journalism because it advocates for the five. in a statement, the city says, quote, if the plaintiffs truly want an open airing of the facts, they should encourage the filmmakers not to hide anything. the filmmakers claim the documentary sticks to the facts. what do you make of the city trying to go after the outtakes for this film? >> the city needs to stop dragging their feet. i don't think they would find anything other than what they already know, that we were innocent and this is just going to continue to further restate that. >> reporter: yusef says no matter the outcome, he may never fully escape his nightmare that started in in park. susan candiotti, cnn, new york. >>> the world watches cape canaveral, florid
workers to the civil-rights campaigns in the 1950's, 1960's, 1970's to the environmental movement. we're taking those lessons and moving forward as we look at a larger pat the militarism. this is not just about libya or somalia or iraq or afghanistan. we're talking about iran, the future, and asking ourselves, how we feel safer when we are involved in more bases and countries than we have been in history? >> dave philipps, place as here today, here in colorado springs. for people across the country who do not understand this city at the foot of the rockies, talk about its military significance for the country. >> and a lot of ways colorado springs is an average town in terms of demographics, in terms of crime rates. just about anything you look at in the senses. the big difference is by far our largest industry, if you want to call it that, is the department of defense. how many active duty to we have here in colorado springs? over 50,000, i believe. that really is the lifeblood of our town. >> this investigation that you did, the unit called lethal warriors, share with us what it is
be relevant to their daily lives. >> reporter: of course, there are first lady dressed as civil rights landmarks and a friendly frog, but there is a lot you may not know. >> and we operate for nasa can and we're on the edge of understanding the basis of dark matter, discovering new planets. >> reporter: whether you a kindergartener or a ph.d candidate, they hope you will find something useful at a new website and that is at seriouslyamazing.com. >> and they are living their lives online and integrated with the way they live every day. >> reporter: they hope you that will agree that it's seriously amazing. in washington, beth parker, fox 5 news. >>> a magical artifact in the smithsonian's museum will be on the move. the ones actress judy garland wore in the wizard of oz are being loaned to the albert museum in london. officials have been negotiating with smithsonian officials for four years to get the slippers. it was not easy and they wanted to include them in the hollywood costume exhibit. they will next head to london the next few weeks. >> we will take them from here beautifully pac
and diversity and civil rights. my mama said, you are a democrat through and through. how did you get off the reservation? [ laughter ] >> well, tell us how you got off the reservation. it was a process, obviously. wasn't one thing. tell me a little bit about that process. >> i think like most voters, we are continually being educated. especially if you're paying attention to the dynamic issues we have today, you're examining yourself, because i believe voting today is a head and heart type of process. in 2008 i think most african- americans were really looking at the head, but also at the heart. >> because of the historic nature of the election and all of that. >> history is an emotional heart thing. this was a moment, and this was where my mom truly was. she said, this is the first time that i could ever, ever dream in my life voting for the first black president. i went to work in chicago, and i was also in the clinton administration. first of all, bill clinton, i worked for rodney slater as well, they say remember those who brung you. when hillary was running, i said this is an opport
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